Why we do something is as important as what we do.
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#1

“The Great Commission was clearly and definitively not a call to sit back and stay silent in a world of sin, evil, and suffering. From the very beginning, Christ designed for His disciples to run toward need–not away from it–to engage culture, not to ignore it. Yet, the church may be one of the only organizations in the world to define success according to what we don’t do.”

—David Platt, Pastor-Teacher at McLean Bible Church, and founder of Radical

Read the full post by David Platt: Children and the Great Commission.

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#2

“What is our goal in fighting for justice? The same as Jesus’s when he healed the sick: to glorify God, bring joy to the hurting, and point to the glorious kingdom where sickness and suffering will be no more. Imperfect justice now whispers of the coming kingdom where perfect justice, eternal righteousness, and no marginalization or oppression will exist. As Christ’s body, our mouths and our hands express this truth, and this forthcoming final reality fuels our zeal to fight for change now.”

—Rayshawn Graves, pastoral assistant at Redemption Hill Church

 

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#3

“The bottom line is that when government complements and enables different spheres to thrive—the businesses, non-profits, and families—then it is championing true justice. But, when government grows so big, it crowds them out, then it ultimately does more harm than good … It is small acts of love that can transform the world one life at a time. And together they form the vital core of a whole-person approach to justice.”

—Jedd Medefind, President of the Christian Alliance for Orphans


Join Jedd
(and members of our Lifesong team) at the national hub for what Christianity Today calls, “the burgeoning Christian orphan care movement.” Learn more about the Christian Alliance for Orphans Summit here.
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#4

“My definition of justice is giving humans their due as people in the image of God. We all agree that everyone deserves not to be enslaved, beaten, raped, or killed. We are not just talking about helping the poor but helping people whose rights are being violated. What people are due is not an easy thing to determine from the Bible. I’m urging Christians not to be so certain that they know how the Bible translates into public policy.”

—Tim Keller, pastor, theologian, and Christian apologist
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#5

“James is not saying that visiting orphans and widows in their affliction is the gospel. Rather, he is saying that visiting orphans and widows is the necessary fruit of the gospel. While it is absolutely essential that we do not confuse social action with the gospel, it is equally essential that we see the pursuit of social justice as the beautiful and Jesus-honoring fruit of the gospel.”

—Dan Cruver, author and president/cofounder of Together for Adoption
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#6

“For the church to live out the Gospel in its simplest and truest form … we must not be afraid to be inconvenienced for loving the vulnerable in our communities. When we welcome and love the people the world wants us to hate, we advance the mission of God.”

—Jenny Yang, author, overseer of advocacy initiatives and policy positions at World Relief

Read Why “The Least of These” Matter Most.
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#7

Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world.

—James 1:27

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Take the love of Christ where it is needed.

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